July 2nd, 2014
fishingboatproceeds:

Walter Dean Myers died yesterday at the age of 76.
I suspect that every YA writer has a Walter Dean Myers story, but here’s mine: In 2006 or 2007, I spent a long plane ride in the cramped back row of an airplane, situated between my editor, Julie Strauss-Gabel, and Walter Dean Myers.
He hadn’t read my books and didn’t know me, but when I finally got up the nerve to introduce myself a couple hours into the flight, he was astonishingly gracious. He shared advice about writing and publishing and stories over the decades. In my many interactions with him since, he was always so kind and gracious to me. He invented so much of contemporary YA lit, but he was always quick to credit and congratulate others.
He will be remembered not just for his brilliant books (he wrote more than 100 of them!) but for his tireless advocacy: He was the National Ambassador for Children’s Literacy until just a few months ago, and in March wrote this brilliant essay about the lack of diversity in children’s books.
Like many young people of my generation, I read Myers’ war novel Fallen Angels in my adolescence—it was, in fact, probably the first YA novel I read (although at the time I didn’t know about book categories; I just thought it was good). A veteran who enlisted in the army at 17, Myers was a brilliant war novelist (Sunrise over Fallujah is also excellent), but he could write about anything: He won the first-ever Printz Award for the brilliant and deeply troubling Monster, about a murder trial, and he won the Coretta Scott King Award an astonishing six times.
It’s hard to imagine YA literature without him.

fishingboatproceeds:

Walter Dean Myers died yesterday at the age of 76.

I suspect that every YA writer has a Walter Dean Myers story, but here’s mine: In 2006 or 2007, I spent a long plane ride in the cramped back row of an airplane, situated between my editor, Julie Strauss-Gabel, and Walter Dean Myers.

He hadn’t read my books and didn’t know me, but when I finally got up the nerve to introduce myself a couple hours into the flight, he was astonishingly gracious. He shared advice about writing and publishing and stories over the decades. In my many interactions with him since, he was always so kind and gracious to me. He invented so much of contemporary YA lit, but he was always quick to credit and congratulate others.

He will be remembered not just for his brilliant books (he wrote more than 100 of them!) but for his tireless advocacy: He was the National Ambassador for Children’s Literacy until just a few months ago, and in March wrote this brilliant essay about the lack of diversity in children’s books.

Like many young people of my generation, I read Myers’ war novel Fallen Angels in my adolescence—it was, in fact, probably the first YA novel I read (although at the time I didn’t know about book categories; I just thought it was good). A veteran who enlisted in the army at 17, Myers was a brilliant war novelist (Sunrise over Fallujah is also excellent), but he could write about anything: He won the first-ever Printz Award for the brilliant and deeply troubling Monster, about a murder trial, and he won the Coretta Scott King Award an astonishing six times.

It’s hard to imagine YA literature without him.

May 20th, 2014

onthelosingside:

cloisteredself:

if you are not utterly heart melted by these two, what the fuck is wrong with you.

This is the cutest thing I have ever seen. 

(Source: hiddlesy, via whoistorule)

tastefullyoffensive:

Where is your trunk, human? [x]

(via someoneinjersey)

May 13th, 2014
fizzyliftingdrank:

illusionaryish:

Imagine if the whole, beautifully paved world looked like this.
These are solar panels that, if placed in the place of roadways and other paving sites (parking lots, parks, etc) can produce more renewable energy than the entire country produces. 
It’s currently in the prototype stage with amazing results. Plus, they can be used in all weather situations that will also make icy roads a thing of the past. Heating elements will melt any ice and snow that sits on top. Another thing, they come with LEDs inside so that you’ll have a better view of the road as you drive. All powered by solar energy. 
I Fucking Love Science posted an article about it and it’s also raising money on indiegogo, which is disgustingly far from the goal. They have some pretty sweet gifts, including bumper stickers, a necklace containing pieces of the prototypes, and an entire working prototype of the plates.
BONUS: The prototypes were made of 10% recycled plastic AND can still handle the heaviest trucks. Imagine what the final product could do.
I urge everyone to at least reblog and spread the message so that hopefully this reaches the goal at May 31st. Projects like this hit me right in the heart because of my passion for renewable energy, which is what I hope to deal with once I’m done with my Engineering degree. I would gladly work on this project if I could, but for now I’m going to settle with donating as much as I can and spreading the word as far as possible.
So, signal boost! <3

Andrew and I talked about this.

fizzyliftingdrank:

illusionaryish:

Imagine if the whole, beautifully paved world looked like this.

These are solar panels that, if placed in the place of roadways and other paving sites (parking lots, parks, etc) can produce more renewable energy than the entire country produces. 

It’s currently in the prototype stage with amazing results. Plus, they can be used in all weather situations that will also make icy roads a thing of the past. Heating elements will melt any ice and snow that sits on top. Another thing, they come with LEDs inside so that you’ll have a better view of the road as you drive. All powered by solar energy. 

I Fucking Love Science posted an article about it and it’s also raising money on indiegogo, which is disgustingly far from the goal. They have some pretty sweet gifts, including bumper stickers, a necklace containing pieces of the prototypes, and an entire working prototype of the plates.

BONUS: The prototypes were made of 10% recycled plastic AND can still handle the heaviest trucks. Imagine what the final product could do.

I urge everyone to at least reblog and spread the message so that hopefully this reaches the goal at May 31st. Projects like this hit me right in the heart because of my passion for renewable energy, which is what I hope to deal with once I’m done with my Engineering degree. I would gladly work on this project if I could, but for now I’m going to settle with donating as much as I can and spreading the word as far as possible.

So, signal boost! <3

Andrew and I talked about this.

(via someoneinjersey)

March 5th, 2014

edwardspoonhands:

karenkavett:

bakathom:

I wanted to make a Doctor Who themed present for my friend's 21st. The gf pointed out Karen Kavett’s Doctor Who Guess Who and I really liked the idea.

But of course I needed to make it super difficult for myself so I decided to mix things up a bit by:

  • Redraw all the characters so that everyone is uniform and front on
  • Include the Doctors from all of the series
  • Make the game more accessible as a Guess Who game for non-Whovians (i.e. make sure there’s more than two of each of the following: male, female, hat, tie, glasses, and other typical Guess Who questions)
  • Try to make the cards look as close to the original cards as possible
  • Do all of this by said friend’s birthday

Spoiler: I didn’t finish this by my friend’s birthday. Or by Christmas. It was more of an early Valentines/late birthday/Christmas gift in the end, but it was all worth it. 

I might post some better photos of the finished product later, but for now these camera phone shots will suffice. Happy late Birthday/Christmas/early Valentines, Ness!

This is amazing! You’re a great illustrator :)

HOLY BALLS

Just wake me up when this semester ends
a new hit single for college students everywhere  (via chuckhansen)

(Source: aomomoendgame, via tomsturridg)

March 1st, 2014

explore-blog:

Measles has surged back in Europe, while whooping cough is has become a problem here in the U.S.

Childhood immunization rates plummeted in parts of Europe and the U.K. after a 1998 study falsely claimed that the vaccine for measles, mumps and rubella was linked to autism.

That study has since been found to be fraudulent. But fears about vaccine safety have stuck around in Europe and here in the U.S.

NPR maps the resurgence of preventable diseases due to public ignorance and lamentable misinformation about vaccines.

Pair with Bill Gates on vaccines, animated.

(Source: explore-blog, via someoneinjersey)

February 25th, 2014
Turning a human being into a thing, is almost always the first step in justifying violence against them.
…objectification creates the climate in which there is widespread increasing violence against women. (Jean Kilbourne - from her award winning documentary Killing Us Softly: Advertising’s Image Of Women)

(Source: mrasarescaredofwomen, via nobodys-pendeja)

March 11th, 2013